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Topics - CWinder

1
Metabolomics: Understanding Metabolism in the 21st Century

We are delighted to announce the 5th run of our free online course

An online course by the Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, University of Birmingham, UK, hosted by Futurelearn

Date: 15 January - 2 February 2018 (estimated learning time 3 hours per week)

Overview
This free online course will provide an introduction to metabolomics, describe the tools and techniques we use to study the metabolome and explain why we want to study the metabolome. The course will be delivered using a combination of short videos, articles and discussions. We will provide quizzes and tests, so that you can review your learning throughout the course. The material will be delivered over a four week period, with an estimated learning time of three hours per week.

Course Syllabus:
  • Metabolomics and the interaction of the metabolome with the genome, proteome and the environment
  • The advantages of studying the metabolome
  • The application of hypothesis generating studies versus the use of traditional hypothesis directed research
  • The use of targeted and non-targeted studies in metabolomics
  • An interdisciplinary approach with case-studies from clinical and environmental scientific areas
  • Important considerations in studying the metabolome
  • An interdisciplinary approach with case-studies from clinical and environmental scientific areas
  • Important considerations in studying the metabolome
  • Experimental design and sample preparation
  • Multivariate data analysis (including unsupervised and supervised approaches)
  • The importance of statistical validation of results
  • The application of mass spectrometry in metabolomics
  • An introduction to data processing and analysis
  • Metabolite identification

Level: The course is primarily aimed at final year undergraduate science students and research scientists who are interested in learning about the application of metabolomics to understand metabolism. However, the course will provide a valuable introduction to metabolomics to scientists at any stage in their career.

For further information and registration details, please visit https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/metabolomics or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
2
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Date: & May 2018 and 22 October 2018
Level: The course is aimed at individuals with no previous experience of metabolomics

Overview
This 1-day course in partnership with the Phenome Centre Birmingham will provide clinicians with an overview of the metabolomics pipeline, highlighting the benefits of the technique to the medical field.

Topics include:
•   Introduction to experimental design and sample collection
•   An overview of both the analytical and computational methods applied in the field
•   Case studies and panel discussions with the experts

For further information and registrations details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/introduction-metabolomics.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
3
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Date: 15-17 May 2018 and 19-21 November 2018
Level: The course is aimed at individuals with minimal previous experience of applying LC-MS in metabolomics studies.

Overview
This 3-day course will introduce you to using the Q Exactive mass spectrometer in your metabolomics investigations. The course will provide a detailed overview of the entire metabolomics pipeline from experimental design to data interpretation and metabolite identification.

Topics include:
•   An introduction to metabolomics and using the Q Exactive mass spectrometer in your studies
•   Polar and non-polar sample preparation for profiling and targeted studies
•   Data acquisition for profiling and targeted studies
•   Data processing and data analysis
•   Introduction to metabolite identification applying Data Dependent Analysis and Data Independent Analysis

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/q-exactive.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
4
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Date: 23-25 June 2018
Level: The course is aimed at PhD students and post-doctoral researchers.

Overview
This 3-day course will provide a comprehensive overview of dealing with complex biological samples for LC-MS analysis. We will illustrate the different approaches that are available to analyse a range of biological samples, applying complementary approaches to maximise the coverage of the metabolome.

Topics include:
•   Quenching and extraction strategies for different biological samples
•   Hands-on sample preparation using different sample types
•   Hands-on HILIC and reversed phase LC-MS data acquisition
•   Solid phase extraction clean up methods
•   An overview of data analysis and metabolite identification

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/sample-analysis.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.

5
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Date: 16-17 April 2018 and 22-23 November 2018
Level: The course is aimed at PhD students and post-doctoral researchers

Overview
This 2-day course will provide a hands-on approach to teach the latest techniques and tools available to perform metabolite identification in non-targeted metabolomics studies. The course will provide significant hands-on experience of using the mass spectrometers (Q Exactive and LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry family), software tools and databases.

Topics include:
•   Importance of mass spectral interpretation
•   Conversion of raw data to molecular formula and putative metabolite annotations
•   MS/MS experiments for on-line data acquisition using the QE (Data dependent acquisition and Data independent acquisition)
•   MS/MS and MSn for sample fractions using the LTQ-Orbitrap
•   Searching mass spectral libraries and tools for mass spectral interpretation

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/metabolite-identification.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
6
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Date: 7-8 June 2018
Level: The course is aimed at PhD students and post-doctoral researchers

Overview
This 2-day course will provide a comprehensive overview of the application of quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) in metabolomics. The course includes both theoretical and practical components to provide hands-one experience of using the mass spectrometer and the analysis of data. Experts who have developed the application of QA and QC procedures within the field will lead the course.

Topics include:
•   Introduce QA and QC in metabolomics
•   The application of QA and QC in untargeted and targeted studies
•   Preparation of QCs and data acquisition
•   Data processing and reporting standards
•   Recommended QA procedures and reporting QA/QC in untargeted and targeted studies

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/quality-phenotyping.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.

7
Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics Research Fellow
Starting salary in range £28,982 to £37,768 a year
Fixed-term for 3 years in the first instance


As part of a £8 million award from the MRC, industry and University of Birmingham, we have established a state-of-the-art metabolic phenotyping (metabolomics) facility to conduct medical research including the development of innovative stratified medicine tools. Phenome Centre Birmingham (PCB), which was formally opened on 23 May 2016 by the UK Government's Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Mark Walport (http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/news/latest/2016/05/Phenome-Centre-Birmingham.aspx), is applying eleven new Thermo Scientific and Waters liquid chromatography-mass spectrometers (LC-MS), two new Bruker 600 MHz NMR spectrometers, liquid handling robots and high specification computational infrastructure to better understand metabolic perturbations in human health, disease and ageing. The facility is anticipated to conduct tens of thousands of analyses per year of human samples including biofluids and tissues, with extensive clinical metadata. It is based alongside one of the largest hospitals in Europe, the Queen Elizabeth hospital at Birmingham, and the new £24 million Institute of Translational Medicine. In addition, the PCB will interact closely with the MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre in London and the new international network of Phenome Centres (www.PhenomeNetwork.org) to enhance metabolic phenotyping in the UK and globally.

We seek to recruit a Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics Research Fellow to focus on the application of metabolic phenotyping, applying primarily non-targeted and targeted LC-MS strategies. The post-holder will work alongside two large and active metabolomics research groups, headed by Professor Viant and Dr Dunn, as well as alongside the national NERC environmental metabolomics facility. The post-holder will perform sample preparation applying manual and robotic approaches, LC-MS instrument maintenance and operation to acquire highly reproducible data in a high-throughput laboratory, and metabolite identification. They will contribute to study design and analytical method development in biomedical analysis.
Applicants should hold a PhD in (bio)analytical chemistry, mass spectrometry or metabolomics, with experience and demonstrated success of working independently and as part of a team in a bioanalytical research facility in industry or academia.

The University offers a variety of courses for personal development of its employees. The University of Birmingham is a family-friendly employer. The School of Biosciences welcomes flexible and part-time working to suit family or other commitments. The University has on-campus childcare facilities.

The post is available in the first instance for 3 years, with the expectation for significant extension subject to the success of the PCB.
Informal enquiries can be addressed to Professor Mark Viant (tel: +44 (0)121 414 2219 or email: M.Viant@bham.ac.uk) or Dr Warwick Dunn (tel: +44 (0)121 414 5458 or email: W.Dunn@bham.ac.uk).
       
For further information or to apply visit: https://atsv7.wcn.co.uk/search_engine/jobs.cgi?amNvZGU9MTYyNzMwNCZ2dF90ZW1wbGF0ZT03Njcmb3duZXI9NTAzMjUyMSZvd25lcnR5cGU9ZmFpciZicmFuZF9pZD0wJnZhY2Zpcm0udmFjdGl0bGU9NTUyMTYmcG9zdGluZ19jb2RlPTExNyZyZXFzaWc9MTQ4NDg1MDkxMS03YzgwYzgyMDg0ZmI1ZDk3NzA5ZDM1YWVkMjhlZDk2OGQyYmRmMWM4&jcode=1627304&vt_template=767&owner=5032521&ownertype=fair&brand_id=0&vacfirm.vactitle=55216&posting_code=117&reqsig=1484850911-7c80c82084fb5d97709d35aed28ed968d2bdf1c8
Closing date:  23 February 2017
Job Reference :  55216
8
Research Fellow in Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics

As part of a £8 million award from the MRC, industry and University of Birmingham, we have established a state-of-the-art metabolic phenotyping (metabolomics) facility to conduct medical research including the development of stratified medicine approaches. Phenome Centre Birmingham (PCB), which was formally opened on 23 May 2016 by the UK Government's Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Mark Walport
(http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/news/latest/2016/05/Phenome-Centre-Birmingham.aspx), is applying eleven new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometers (LC-MS), two new Bruker 600 MHz NMR spectrometers, liquid handling robots and high specification computational infrastructure to better understand metabolic perturbations in human health, disease and ageing. The facility is anticipated to conduct tens of thousands of analyses of human samples per year, creating genuinely "Big Data", with extensive clinical metadata. It is based alongside one of the largest hospitals in Europe, the Queen Elizabeth Hospital at Birmingham, and the new £24 million Institute of Translational Medicine. In addition, the PCB will interact closely with the MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre in London and the new international network of Phenome Centres to enhance metabolic phenotyping in the UK and globally.

We seek a highly motivated individual to join the 10-person PC-B team and contribute to fulfilling the research objectives of this centre with a focus on the development and application of metabolic phenotyping to medical research and to enhance stratified medicine. The job will include study design, sample preparation, data acquisition applying mass spectrometry platforms, project management and training. The job will also involve extensive collaborations with researchers and clinicians within and external to the university (academic, industry, scientific instrument manufacturers).

Applicants should hold a PhD (awarded) in metabolomics, mass spectrometry or (bio)analytical chemistry, with experience of small molecule analysis and a high level of analytical chemistry skills, in particular experience in the operation of mass spectrometry platforms.

The University offers a variety of courses for personal development of its employees. The University of Birmingham is a family-friendly employer. The School of Biosciences welcomes flexible and part-time working to suit family or other commitments. The University has on-campus childcare facilities.

The post is available in the first instance for 2 years with the expectation for significant extension subject to the success of Phenome Centre Birmingham. Informal enquiries can be addressed to Professor Mark Viant (tel: +44 (0)121 414 2219 or email: M.Viant@bham.ac.uk)   or   Dr   Warwick   Dunn   (tel:   +44   (0)121   414   5458   or   email: W.Dunn@bham.ac.uk).

Closing date: 22nd January 2017
Reference Number: 55220
For further information or to apply visit: www.hr.bham.ac.uk/jobs
9
Metabolomics Data Processing and Data Analysis Online Course

An online course by the Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, University of Birmingham, UK, hosted by Futurelearn

Date: 2 -27 April 2018 (estimated learning time 4 hours per week)
Registration Fee: Early-bird registration £200, Standard £220

Overview
This four-week online course will explore the tools and approaches that are used to process and analyse metabolomics data, we will investigate the challenges that are typically encountered in the analysis of metabolomics data and provide solutions to overcome these problems. The course will be delivered using a combination of short videos, articles, discussions, and online workshops with step-by-step instructions and test data sets. We will provide quizzes, polls and peer review exercises each week, so that you can review your learning throughout the course. The material will be delivered over a four week period, with an estimated learning time of four hours per week. If you do not have time to complete the course during the 4-week period you will retain access to the course material to revisit, as you are able.

Course Syllabus:
  • An introduction to metabolomics
  • An overview of the untargeted metabolomics workflow
  • The influence of experimental design and data acquisition on data analysis and data quality
  • Processing of NMR data
  • Processing direct infusion mass spectrometry data
  • Processing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data
  • Reporting standards and data repositories
  • Data analysis, detecting outliers and drift, and pre-treatment methods
  • Univariate data analysis
  • Multivariate data analysis (including unsupervised and supervised approaches)
  • The importance of statistical validation of results
  • Computational approaches for metabolite identification and translation of results into biological knowledge
  • What are the future challenges for data processing and analysis in metabolomics

Level: The course would be ideally suited to MSc / PhD students or scientists who are in the early stages of analysing metabolomics data. No previous knowledge of the data processing and statistical analysis approaches is assumed, but a basic understanding of the metabolome, and the analytical techniques applied in the metabolomics field would be beneficial. A pre-course recommended reading list will be provided.

For further information and registration details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/Metabolomics-Data-Processing-and-Data-Analysis.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.