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1
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Dates: 28 February - 1 March 2019
Level: The course is suitable for individuals with no previous experience of metabolomics.

Overview
This 2-day NERC-funded Advanced Training Short Course provides environmental scientists with an overview of the metabolomics pipeline. The course is intended for environmental scientist with little or no previous experience of metabolomics and who are interested to discover how this relatively new and powerful approach could be integrated into their research. Experts working in the NERC Metabolomics facility NBAF-B will teach the course.

Topics include:
  • Introduction to environmental metabolomics with case studies
  • Experimental design and quality control
  • Sample collection and preparation
  • Overview of analytical laboratory techniques (mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy)
  • Short practical demonstrations and a tour of the metabolomics facilities
  • Overview of data processing and statistics for metabolomics
  • Introduction to metabolite identification
  • Q&A session with an opportunity for course leads to provide advice on your own metabolomics studies

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/sample-analysis.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
2
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Dates: 11 March 2019 | 25 October 2019
Level: The course is suitable for individuals with no previous experience of metabolomics.

Overview
This 1-day course in partnership with the Phenome Centre Birmingham provides clinicians with an overview of the metabolomics pipeline highlighting the benefits of this technique to the medical field and an introduction to the Phenome Centre Birmingham and the MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre.

The course provides a suitable introduction to metabolomics prior to taking additional training courses at either the Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre or the Imperial International Phenome Training Centre.  

Topics include:
  • Introduction to the Phenome Centre Birmingham, showcasing facilities and expertise available.
  • Introduction to metabolomics
  • Importance of experimental design and sample collection
  • Overview of the technologies available for data acquisition including discovery phase profiling and targeted analysis for the validation of biomarkers
  • Overview of data analysis approaches
  • Case studies - large-scale metabolic phenotyping, translation to targeted assays and clinical practice
  • Question and answer session with the experts

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/sample-analysis.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
3
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Dates: 4 - 5 April 2019 | 20 - 21 November 2019
Level: The course is suitable for PhD students and post-doctoral researchers who have been actively applying metabolomics for a minimum of 6 months. If students or researchers would like to take the course but do not have the recommended level of experience please contact the course administrator for advice.

Overview
This 2-day course provides a hands-on approach to teach attendees about the latest techniques and tools available to perform metabolite identification in non-targeted metabolomics studies. The course is led by experts working within the field of metabolomics, and will include a significant proportion of hands-on experience of using mass spectrometers, software tools and databases. A maximum of four people will be working on each mass spectrometer (Q Exactive and LTQ-Orbitrap Elite) in a session.

Topics include:
  • Importance of mass spectral interpretation
  • Types of data which can be collected on the QE and LTQ-Orbitrap Elite (m/z, retention time, MS/MS, MSn)
  • Conversion of raw data to molecular formula and putative metabolite annotations
  • MS/MS experiments in metabolic phenotyping for on-line data acquisition using the QE (Data Dependent Analysis, Data Independent Analysis)
  • MS/MS and MSn experiments for sample fractions using the LTQ-Orbitrap Elite
  • Mass spectral libraries (using mzCloud)
  • Searching mass spectral libraries
  • Tools for mass spectral interpretation
  • In silico fragmentation (using MassFrontier)
  • Reporting standards for metabolite identification
  • Question and answer session with the experts

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/metabolite-identification.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
4
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Dates: 1 - 3 April 2019 | 6 - 8 November 2019
Level: The course is aimed at individuals with minimal previous experience of applying LC-MS in metabolomics studies. A working knowledge of LC-MS would be advantageous.

Overview
This 3-day course introduces you to using the Q Exactive mass spectrometer in your metabolomics investigations. The course is led by experts in the field of metabolomics and includes lectures, laboratory sessions and computer workshops to provide a detailed overview of the metabolomics pipeline applying the Q Exactive mass spectrometer.

Topics include:
  • Introduction to Metabolomics on the Q Exactive, the metabolomics workflow, and case studies using the Q Exactive
  • Using the Q Exactive family of instruments in your metabolomics investigations
  • Experimental design and the importance of quality control samples
  • Sample preparation including polar and non-polar preparation methods on biofluids (urine and plasma) and tissue samples
  • Preparation of samples for profiling and targeted analyses on the Q Exactive
  • Hands-on data acquisition for profiling and targeted studies, setting up the Vanquish UHPLC coupled to the Q Exactive MS
  • Data processing workshop
  • Data analysis workshop (univariate and multivariate analysis)
  • Introduction to metabolite identification applying Data Dependent Analysis and Data Independent Analysis
  • Question and answer session with a panel of experts
  • Tips and tricks
  • Problem solving

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/q-exactive.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
5
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Dates: 30 January - 1 February 2019 | 9 - 11 October 2019
Level: The course is aimed at PhD students and post-doctoral researchers.

Overview
This three-day course introduces how untargeted metabolomics can be applied to study microbial systems in academic and industrial research. The course provides an overview of the metabolomics pipeline, experimental design, sample preparation and data acquisition. The course is led by experts in the field of metabolomics and will include lectures, hands-on laboratory sessions in sample preparation and data acquisition and computer workshops focused on data processing and data analysis.

Topics include:
  • Introduction to metabolomics, both targeted and untargeted approaches
  • Experimental design and the importance of quality control samples in untargeted metabolomics
  • Analytical strategies applied in metabolomics with a focus on mass spectrometry
  • Hands-on laboratory sessions focused on sample preparation and to include metabolic quenching and extraction procedures, intracellular and exometabolome samples, and polar and non-polar extraction methods
  • Hands-on laboratory sessions focused on sample analysis for untargeted metabolomics studies using an Acquity UPLC coupled to a Xevo QToF mass spectrometer
  • Hands-on workshop focused on data processing and data analysis
  • An introduction to metabolite identification
  • Question and answer session with the experts

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/introduction-metabolomics-microbiologist.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
6
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Dates: 16-18 January 2019 | 25-27 September 2019
Level: The course is aimed at PhD students and post-doctoral researchers.

Overview
This 3-day course will provide a comprehensive overview of dealing with complex biological samples for LC-MS analysis. We will illustrate the different approaches that are available to analyse a range of biological samples, applying complementary approaches to maximise the coverage of the metabolome.

Topics include:
•   Quenching and extraction strategies for different biological samples
•   Hands-on sample preparation using different sample types
•   Hands-on HILIC and reversed phase LC-MS data acquisition
•   Solid phase extraction clean up methods
•   An overview of data analysis and metabolite identification

Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available for PhD students funded by NERC.

For further information and registration details, please visit http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/sample-analysis.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
7
Post: Postdoctoral Fellow in Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolomics
Department: IU Bloomington Public & Environmental Affairs

Full text: https://indiana.peopleadmin.com/postings/6871

Position Summary:
We are recruiting a postdoctoral fellow in Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolomics at Indiana University Bloomington to participate in an exciting, new collaborative project called PhyloTox, which seeks to identify the evolutionary origins of molecular toxicity pathways. Using transcriptomics and metabolomics data collected from a group of model species/cells exposed to a carefully selected suite of chemicals, biological insights will be drawn from the perturbation of entire genetic and biochemical networks via chemical ablation. The ultimate goal of the project is to develop a novel precision environmental health program to help solve the enormous environmental health crisis caused by environmental pollution.

For this position, we seek a postdoctoral fellow in Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics to focus on the application of metabolic phenotyping across a six model organisms/cell lines, applying primarily non-targeted LC-MS strategies. The post-holder will perform sample preparation applying manual and robotic approaches, LC-MS instrument maintenance and operation to acquire highly reproducible data in a high-throughput laboratory, and metabolite identification. They will contribute to study design and analytical method development in cutting edge, biomedical computational and statistical analysis.

The project involves working with several PIs and laboratories and, thus, collaborative skills and results-oriented project management are required. The position is localized at Indiana University Bloomington in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Department of Chemistry, Department of Environmental Health, and Department of Intelligent Systems Engineering. The position also includes a unique training opportunity under the guidance of Prof Mark Viant in the world class metabolomics facility of the University of Birmingham, UK (https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/staff/profiles/biosciences/viant-mark.aspx). This position will either be assigned to the Department of Chemistry or the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, whichever is the best fit for the successful candidate.

Questions regarding the position or application process can be directed to: Drs. Joseph Shaw (joeshaw@indiana.edu) or Stephen Jacobson (jacobson@indiana.edu).

To apply: Interested candidates should review the application requirements and submit their application online: https://indiana.peopleadmin.com/. The application should consist of a cover letter stating your accomplishments and interest in the project's research, curriculum vitae, and letters of support from at least two references. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Applications received by November 15, 2018 will receive full consideration.
8
Venue: Online
Date: 8 October 2018 - 2 November 2018 (~4 hours per week)
Level: The course would be ideally suited to MSc / PhD students or scientists who are in the early stages of analysing metabolomics data. No previous knowledge of the data processing and statistical analysis approaches is assumed, but a basic understanding of the metabolome, and the analytical techniques applied in the metabolomics field would be beneficial. A pre-course recommended reading list will be provided.

Overview
This online course explores the tools and approaches that are used to process and analyse metabolomics data. You will investigate the challenges that are typically encountered in the analysis of metabolomics data, and provide solutions to overcome these problems. The course is delivered using a combination of short videos, articles, discussions, and online workshops with step-by-step instructions and test data sets. We provide quizzes, polls and peer review exercises each week, so that you can review your learning throughout the course.

The material is delivered over a four week period, with an estimated learning time of four hours per week. We support your learning via social discussions where you will be able post questions and comments to the team of educators and the other learners on the course. In the final week of the course there is a live question and answer session with the entire team of educators.  If you do not have time to complete the course during the 4-week period you will retain access to the course material to revisit, as you are able.

Topics include:
  • An introduction to metabolomics
  • An overview of the untargeted metabolomics workflow
  • The influence of experimental design and data acquisition on data analysis and data quality
  • Processing of NMR data
  • Processing direct infusion mass spectrometry data
  • Processing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data
  • Reporting standards and data repositories
  • Data analysis, detecting outliers and drift, and pre-treatment methods
  • Univariate data analysis
  • Multivariate data analysis (including unsupervised and supervised approaches)
  • The importance of statistical validation of results
  • Computational approaches for metabolite identification and translation of results into biological knowledge
  • What are the future challenges for data processing and analysis in metabolomics

For further information and registration details, please visit https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/Metabolomics-Data-Processing-and-Data-Analysis.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
9
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Date: 22-23 November 2018
Level: The course is suitable for PhD students and post-doctoral researchers who have been actively applying metabolomics for a minimum of 6 months. If students or researchers would like to take the course but do not have the recommended level of experience please contact the course administrator for advice.

Overview
This 2-day course provides a hands-on approach to teach attendees about the latest techniques and tools available to perform metabolite identification in non-targeted metabolomics studies. The course is led by experts working within the field of metabolomics, and will include a significant proportion of hands-on experience of using mass spectrometers, software tools and databases. A maximum of four people will be working on each mass spectrometer (Q Exactive and LTQ-Orbitrap Elite) in a session.

Topics include:
  • Importance of mass spectral interpretation
  • Types of data which can be collected on the QE and LTQ-Orbitrap Elite (m/z, retention time, MS/MS, MSn)
  • Conversion of raw data to molecular formula and putative metabolite annotations
  • MS/MS experiments in metabolic phenotyping for on-line data acquisition using the QE (Data Dependent Analysis, Data Independent Analysis)
  • MS/MS and MSn experiments for sample fractions using the LTQ-Orbitrap Elite
  • Mass spectral libraries (using mzCloud)
  • Searching mass spectral libraries
  • Tools for mass spectral interpretation
  • In silico fragmentation (using MassFrontier)
  • Reporting standards for metabolite identification
  • Question and answer session with the experts

For further information and registration details, please visit https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/metabolite-identification.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
10
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Date: 19-21 November 2018
Level: The course is aimed at individuals with minimal previous experience of applying LC-MS in metabolomics studies. A working knowledge of LC-MS would be advantageous.

Overview
This 3-day course introduces you to using the Q Exactive mass spectrometer in your metabolomics investigations. The course is led by experts in the field of metabolomics and includes lectures, laboratory sessions and computer workshops to provide a detailed overview of the metabolomics pipeline applying the Q Exactive mass spectrometer.

Topics include:
  • Introduction to Metabolomics on the Q Exactive, the metabolomics workflow, and case studies using the Q Exactive
  • Using the Q Exactive family of instruments in your metabolomics investigations
  • Experimental design and the importance of quality control samples
  • Sample preparation including polar and non-polar preparation methods on biofluids (urine and plasma) and tissue samples
  • Preparation of samples for profiling and targeted analyses on the Q Exactive
  • Hands-on data acquisition for profiling and targeted studies, setting up the Vanquish UHPLC coupled to the Q Exactive MS
  • Data processing workshop
  • Data analysis workshop (univariate and multivariate analysis)
  • Introduction to metabolite identification applying Data Dependent Analysis and Data Independent Analysis
  • Question and answer session with a panel of experts
  • Tips and tricks
  • Problem solving

For further information and registration details, please visit https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/q-exactive.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
11
Venue: Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
Date: 22 October 2018
Level: The course is suitable for individuals with no previous experience of metabolomics.

Overview
This 1-day course in partnership with the Phenome Centre Birmingham provides clinicians with an overview of the metabolomics pipeline highlighting the benefits of this technique to the medical field and an introduction to the Phenome Centre Birmingham and the MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre.

The course provides a suitable introduction to metabolomics prior to taking additional training courses at either the Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre or the Imperial International Phenome Training Centre.  

Topics include:

  • Introduction to the Phenome Centre Birmingham, showcasing facilities and expertise available.
  • Introduction to metabolomics
  • Importance of experimental design and sample collection
  • Overview of the technologies available for data acquisition including discovery phase profiling and targeted analysis for the validation of biomarkers
  • Overview of data analysis approaches
  • Case studies - large-scale metabolic phenotyping, translation to targeted assays and clinical practice
  • Question and answer session with the experts

For further information and registration details, please visit https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/metabolomics-training-centre/courses/introduction-metabolomics.aspx or contact bmtc@contacts.bham.ac.uk.
12

Sample Preparation & NMR Metabolomics Specialist Technician

Salary from £26,495 to £28,936, with potential progression once in post to £32,548 a year.

The post is available in the first instance for 18 months, with a potential for extension.

As part of a £8m award from the MRC, industry and University of Birmingham, we have established a state-of-the-art metabolic phenotyping (metabolomics) facility to conduct research in human health and disease. Phenome Centre Birmingham (PCB) applies two Bruker 600 MHz NMR spectrometers, eleven liquid chromatography-mass spectrometers (LC-MS), liquid handling robots and high specification computational infrastructure to better understand metabolic perturbations in disease, toxicology and exercise science. The facility has the capacity and capability to conduct tens of thousands of metabolite analyses per year, creating genuinely 'Big Data' and societal impact.

We seek to recruit a full-time highly motivated Sample Preparation & NMR Metabolomics Technician to join the team of nine scientists at the PCB. The successful candidate will contribute to fulfilling the research objectives of the centre with a focus on sample management, the preparation of human biofluid and tissue samples by applying liquid handling robots, and the application of NMR spectrometry for metabolic phenotyping. They will lead the data collection of large scale NMR based metabolomics studies in collaboration with researchers within and external to the University, including academic, industry, scientific instrument manufacturer scientists.

Applicants should at least hold a Bachelor's degree (in a physical science), with hands-on experience in sample preparation robotics and small molecule NMR spectroscopy.

Informal enquiries can be addressed to Dr Andrea Mitchell on tel: +44 (0)121 414 4062 or a.m.mitchell@bham.ac.uk or Professor Mark Viant on tel: +44 (0)121 414 2219 or email: M.Viant@bham.ac.uk
 
For further details on the Phenome Centre Birmingham, visit: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/phenome-centre/index.aspx

Applicants are invited to apply on-line via our e-recruitment system here. Please quote post number 51680 in any correspondence.

Closing date: 24 June 2018

Job Reference: 51680

Valuing excellence; sustaining investment
13
Role: Research Fellow in Bioinformatics/Biostatistics
Salary: Full time starting salary is normally in the range £29,799 to £38,832. With potential progression once in post to £41,212 a year.

Job Purpose

To contribute significantly to the excellence of the 'metabolomics ecosystem' at the University of Birmingham, primarily contributing to the NERC Biomolecular Analysis Facility - Birmingham (NBAF-B), the UK's national research centre for Environmental Metabolomics. Additionally, to engage with scientists in Phenome Centre Birmingham as well as Viant's, Dunn's and Weber's research teams. The postholder will develop and apply expert analysis of large-scale mass spectrometry and/or NMR spectroscopy based metabolomics datasets, including experimental design, data processing, statistical analysis and/or network analysis; to contribute to the Birmingham Metabolomics Training Centre; and to undertake independent research in bioinformatics/biostatistics.

Person Specification
•   PhD or equivalent experience in Bioinformatics, Biostatistics, Chemometrics or Metabolomics (all with metabolomics or related specialism).
•   Experience in the application of statistical / computational methods to the analysis of metabolomics datasets (either mass spectrometry and/or NMR spectroscopy based).
•   Experience in a range of statistical analysis methods, including multivariate and univariate methods.
•   Experience in programming, for example scripting in R, Python, Matlab.
•   Experience in managing multiple projects simultaneously.
•   Excellent communication and interpersonal skills, including the ability to communicate complex information clearly.
•   A high level of accuracy and attention to detail.
•   Ability to work on own initiative, manage time effectively, progress tasks concurrently and work to deadlines.
•   Detailed knowledge of office safety.
•   Ability to assess resource requirements and use resources effectively.

For further information and to apply for this role, please visit: https://atsv7.wcn.co.uk/search_engine/jobs.cgi?SID=amNvZGU9MTcwMTkxNyZ2dF90ZW1wbGF0ZT03Njcmb3duZXI9NTAzMjUyMSZvd25lcnR5cGU9ZmFpciZicmFuZF9pZD0wJnZhY2Zpcm0udmFjdGl0bGU9NDczMjImcG9zdGluZ19jb2RlPTExNw==
14
Role: Research Fellow in Molecular Toxicology
Salary: Full time starting salary is normally in the range £29,799 to £38,832. With potential progression once in post to £41,212 a year.

Role Description
To contribute to the achievement of the School of Biosciences' research vision in translational molecular toxicology by undertaking specified research activities within a thriving and well-established collaboration with a team of scientists at Unilever.

This post forms the central component of a research project with Unilever "Towards an integrated approach in defining the MoA / KE of chemicals". As such the postholder will build upon some very large scale multi-omics studies (transcriptomics and metabolomics) that have recently investigated the effects of chemicals on the health of Daphnia magna, specifically with the goal to discover modes of action and putative key events. The postholder will focus on the translation of these putative key events into a robust mechanistic understanding of toxicity; and additionally to collaborate with scientists from Unilever to integrate this new knowledge into their chemical safety science. Significant opportunities exist to more deeply mine the wealth of omics data that has been generated within the earlier laboratory investigations. The role will be to conduct Daphnia toxicity exposure studies focusing on high resolution concentration-response studies, conducting targeted gene expression and metabolite assays, undertake extensive statistical analyses to build and characterise the key event relationships within an Adverse Outcome Pathway framework, and ultimately generate new knowledge in toxicology.

Person Specification
•   PhD or equivalent experience in Molecular (Eco)Toxicology or a related discipline.
•   Experience in chemical exposure studies, ideally in vivo studies of aquatic organisms.
•   Experience in the measurement of gene expression and/or targeted metabolite analysis using LC-MS/MS approaches.
•   Experience in a range of univariate and multivariate statistical analysis methods.
•   Experience in managing multiple tasks simultaneously.
•   Excellent communication and interpersonal skills, including the ability to communicate complex information clearly.
•   A high level of accuracy and attention to detail.
•   Ability to work on own initiative, manage time effectively, progress tasks concurrently and work to deadlines.
•   Detailed knowledge of office safety.
•   Ability to assess resource requirements and use resources effectively.

For more information and to apply, please visit: https://atsv7.wcn.co.uk/search_engine/jobs.cgi?SID=amNvZGU9MTcwMTkyMiZ2dF90ZW1wbGF0ZT03Njcmb3duZXI9NTAzMjUyMSZvd25lcnR5cGU9ZmFpciZicmFuZF9pZD0wJnZhY2Zpcm0udmFjdGl0bGU9NTUyMjUmcG9zdGluZ19jb2RlPTExNw